Happy Valley: Best and worst of 2012 | Student Review

3.

Best Debate About a Mall Any of Us will Likely Ever See

In Salt Lake City, the lavish City Creek Center opened on March 22 again causing an explosion of opinion in the Bloggernacle, due to the fact that it is owned in part by the LDS Church and cost roughly $5 bajillion worth of the widow’s mite to build. Detractors called it the Anti-Christ of Shopping Malls (Retractable Roof/Fake Creek Division) and supporters insisted it was the pure manifestation of God’s Will on Earth. The unaware proletariat streamed in happily to look at things they couldn’t afford, and all the cool stores ditched Gateway to hang out with the popular new kid.

“the Bloggernacle!?”

Nielsen: TV Still King In Media Consumption; Only 16 Percent Of TV Homes Have Tablets

neilsen media 2012

It???s not too late for yet one more 2012 year-in-review report, and today???s latest addition comes from Nielsen, which examined how Americans have been consuming content over the course of the past year. The report found that of the 289 million U.S. TV owners, 119 million own four or more television sets, making TV still the device to beat when it comes to watching and recording programs, among other things.

The TV owning audience can also be further split up by how they access their programing and what sort of things they use their TV for, besides live viewing.

“TV” in this context appears to refer to the large stand-alone monitor that comes with a receiver built in. Highlight, “broadcast/over-the-air only is down from 16% in 2003 to 9%”

The 10 highest-rating NBR tech stories of 2012

Content and copyright were hot buttons in 2012. And in keeping with those themes, the best-read technology story of the year was the tale of Fyx – a new Auckland ISP that allowed New Zealanders to access US commercial download services such as Netflix and Hulu, ordinarily blocked to those outside North America.

Fyx briefly gave us a glimpse of what life could like for those willing to pay for online content. Momentarily, we lived in a global village of consumer choice, unshackled from content agreements that are nothing about copyright, and everything about maintaining regional distribution monopolies.

Interest was intense. The story generated 60,000 page impressions, making it the most clicked-on NBR story outside of the Rich List. Clearly, there is a high level of curiosity about any developments in the area of street-legal downloads (an April 2011 piece on using iTunes US gained enough new traffic to stay in the Top 10 for a second year, helped by an update about tapping iTunes Australia). Threats to globally-distributed content, such as the US laws SOPA and PIPA, and the TPP trade deal, also rated highly.

 

Here’s the 10 tech stories that drew the most traffic:

14 big trends to watch in 2013

  1. Liquid data
  2. Networked accountability
  3. Data as infrastructure
  4. Social coding
  5. Data commons
  6. Lean government
  7. Smart government
  8. Sharing economy
  9. Preemptive health care
  10. Predictive data analytics
  11. Algorithmic censorship and algorithmic transparency
  12. Personal data ownership
  13. Open journalism
  14. Automation, artificial intelligence and employment

Also Big, open and more networked than ever: 10 trends from 2012

Creative Commons Meetup: Open Research and OER in Tertiary

THURSDAY 12 July 2012, 6pm-7pm at NetHui 2012, SkyCity Convention Centre

Creative Commons licences are an important aspect of wider movements facing our tertiary sector: Open Access to research outputs, and Open Education Resources. Academics have seen international tensions between the drive to make publicly funded research available to taxpayers, and the traditionally closed models of the publishing industry. There is also an urgent push to lower the cost of producing educational materials, and providing free access to them online for public consumption.