Facebook Fires ‘Killing Blow’ Into $55 Billion Market

As we reported last August, Open Compute could disrupt some of the largest enterprise tech companies in the world like IBM, HP, and Dell. It does for commercial hardware what open source did for commercial software???lets the users design what they want.

OCP has created a new type of server that costs less to build and operate. It uses fewer materials and causes less waste for the landfill when decommissioned, too.

This week, the project introduced new features that turn a computer server into a Lego-like assembly project where IT people can pick and choose all the components, right down to the CPU, and snap them together.

Plug and play down to the metal.

14 big trends to watch in 2013

  1. Liquid data
  2. Networked accountability
  3. Data as infrastructure
  4. Social coding
  5. Data commons
  6. Lean government
  7. Smart government
  8. Sharing economy
  9. Preemptive health care
  10. Predictive data analytics
  11. Algorithmic censorship and algorithmic transparency
  12. Personal data ownership
  13. Open journalism
  14. Automation, artificial intelligence and employment

Also Big, open and more networked than ever: 10 trends from 2012

The Web We Lost

When you see interesting data mash-ups today, they are often still using Flickr photos because Instagram’s meager metadata sucks, and the app is only reluctantly on the web at all. We get excuses about why we can’t search for old tweets or our own relevant Facebook content, though we got more comprehensive results from a Technorati search that was cobbled together on the feeble software platforms of its era. We get bullshit turf battles like Tumblr not being able to find your Twitter friends or Facebook not letting Instagram photos show up on Twitter because of giant companies pursuing their agendas instead of collaborating in a way that would serve users. And we get a generation of entrepreneurs encouraged to make more narrow-minded, web-hostile products like these because it continues to make a small number of wealthy people even more wealthy, instead of letting lots of people build innovative new opportunities for themselves on top of the web itself.

Open for all, closed for a few. Beneficiaries I mean.

Where are all the open-source mobile projects?

And perhaps it’s just a matter of time before open source takes center stage in mobile. Today mobile developers are just trying to get work done in a highly fragmented market. As the industry settles on norms for the kinds of services and infrastructure one needs to build successful mobile experiences, I suspect we’ll see open source stake its claim to the market, similar to what happened in the server market 20 years ago.