AT&T’s Randall & Stankey: Wireless data growth half the FCC prediction

With growth rates less than half of the predictions, a data-driven FCC and Congress has no reason to rush to bad policy. Wireless technology is rapidly moving to sharing spectrum, whether in-building small cells, WiFi, White Spaces, Shared RAN or tools of what the engineers are calling hetnets – heterogenous networks. The last thing policymakers should do is tie up more spectrum for exclusive use; shared spectrum often yields three to ten times as much capacity. 
 Bad compromises on the video spectrum are unnecessary because plenty of spectrum is unused. That includes the 20 MHz that M2Z would be building out today if Julius hadn’t blocked them; the 20 MHz the cable companies are sitting on and want to sell to Verizon; and the 30 MHz or so Stankey identifies as fallow at AT&T. 

Another case for the removal of exclusivity and more general spectrum allocation. Making a decision now about what’s best denies the flexibility the likes of 802.22 et al can provide through smarter, cognitive, approaches.

The Freelance Panoptiswarm

Here???s a glimpse of the future: Ubiquitous cheap sensors. Perpetual freelance surveillance. Relentless sunlight, directed by shoals of shadowy interest groups.

It has been a bounteous season for panoptiswarm-related news (previously: 1, 2, 3). Sea Shepherd has drones now. They are using them to track the Japanese whaling fleet. Occupy has a drone. It is called the occucopter. There

Herald on Sunday Editorial: The disquieting Dotcom case

Depicting Dotcom as a sweating Dr Evil was clearly in line with the police’s PR needs, but as Judge David McNaughton remarked, no evidence has been presented that Dotcom has done anything wrong, and there “appears to be an arguable defence at least in respect of the breach of copyright charges”. The public is asked to be content with allegations by the FBI, which include conspiracy to commit racketeering and money-laundering. We would not be the first to note that copyright infringement, the central charge against Dotcom, does not carry a heavy enough maximum penalty to trigger the provisions of an extradition treaty.

Very pleased to see some push-back on the narrative, I was beginning to think the NZ media, no doubt as overjoyed as the Police to have something so exciting to be involved with, had swallowed the story whole.

10 reasons the U.S. is no longer the land of the free

Assassination of U.S. citizens

President Obama has claimed, as President George W. Bush did before him, the right to order the killing of any citizen considered a terrorist or an abettor of terrorism. Last year, he approved the killing of U.S. citizen Anwar al-Awlaqi and another citizen under this claimed inherent authority. Last month, administration officials affirmed that power, stating that the president can order the assassination of any citizen whom he considers allied with terrorists.

Bill of attainder’s back.

EC publishes proposed data protection reforms

Key changes in the reform include:

???A single set of rules on data protection, valid across the EU. Unnecessary administrative requirements, such as notification requirements for companies, will be removed. This will save businesses around ???2.3 billion a year.

???Instead of the current obligation of all companies to notify all data protection activities to data protection supervisors ??? a requirement that has led to unnecessary paperwork and costs businesses ???130 million per year, the Regulation provides for increased responsibility and accountability for those processing personal data.

???For example, companies and organisations must notify the national supervisory authority of serious data breaches as soon as possible (if feasible within 24 hours).

???Organisations will only have to deal with a single national data protection authority in the EU country where they have their main establishment. Likewise, people can refer to the data protection authority in their country, even when their data is processed by a company based outside the EU. Wherever consent is required for data to be processed, it is clarified that it has to be given explicitly, rather than assumed.

???People will have easier access to their own data and be able to transfer personal data from one service provider to another more easily (right to data portability). This will improve competition among services.

???A ???right to be forgotten??? will help people better manage data protection risks online: people will be able to delete their data if there are no legitimate grounds for retaining it.

???EU rules must apply if personal data is handled abroad by companies that are active in the EU market and offer their services to EU citizens.

???Independent national data protection authorities will be strengthened so they can better enforce the EU rules at home. They will be empowered to fine companies that violate EU data protection rules. This can lead to penalties of up to ???1 million or up to 2% of the global annual turnover of a company.

???A new directive will apply general data protection principles and rules for police and judicial cooperation in criminal matters. The rules will apply to both domestic and cross-border transfers of data.