Tasman Global Access Launched ??? Positives/Negatives

With the announcing of a non-binding MOU between Telecom, Telstra and Vodafone to build a new trans-Tasman cable, I have noted a few points that immediately come to mind, both good and bad.

Positives:

  • Content providers such as Amazon, Google, Microsoft, Akamai, etc all peer out of Sydney, so providing cheap point to point connectivity to this wealth of data is of huge benefit. If the price per Mbps is significantly lower than that currently available over southern cross, ISP’s may well look to leave aside local caching options, which in turn brings more content closer to shore.
  • Without being able to confirm this, the building of this second cable “may” remove some barriers around dual country access as required by some of the content providers listed above and make it more likely that NZ will have those networks move on to our shores in the years to come, providing they aren’t put off by Telecom’s partial ownership in both cables, and that domestic demand warrants the expense.

Wonder if “dual country access” would be better addressed by diverse landing stations…

 

Routing | Deploy360 Programme

Though Internet routing has worked well over the years, there have been instances of errors that caused routing stability issues. There is also opportunity for malicious activities that could damage the routing infrastructure in the future. To prevent future errors and malicious activity, it is important to increase the resiliency and security of the Internet???s routing infrastructure through the adoption of best current operational practices for routing resiliency and the deployment of secure routing protocols.

As noted in our blog post announcing this new topic area, when we speak of ???resiliency??? we mean:

the ability of the network to provide and maintain an acceptable level of service in the face of various faults and challenges to normal operation.

In the months ahead we will be engaging with network operators around the world to help understand how we can best help them and the larger operator community make the Internet more secure and resilient.

Hong Kong has fastest peak internet speed in world

The top recorded speed of 54.1 megabits per second was documented in Hong Kong in the third quarter of 2012, according to the State of the Internet report issued by Akamai Technologies yesterday.

No country previously had gone beyond 50 Mbps.

“It wouldn’t have been possible without changes in policy earlier to force competition between internet service providers,” Edmon Chung Wang-on, chief executive of DotAsia, and vice chairman of the Internet Society of Hong Kong, said yesterday.

“Without the competitive environment we wouldn’t have such a good network at such a low cost. Before there were only a couple of providers, and when the new guy came in things started to move.”

 

The Internet: Who Built That?!

So Who Really Did Build the Assemblage which is the Internet? (Part 6)

The internet is translative boundary object for political thought, situated between four liberal ideologies about freedom and the state, corporation, individual, and the public. The internet is thus a parallax object, looking different from what ideological perspective one looks at it.

Its clear that Crovitz twisted his story to fit his technolibertarian agenda. Manjoo aligned his more accurate history of the internet in a technoprogressive defense of the president???s wickedly edited non-gaffe. McCracken used a most overused and unconvincing technoindividualistic argument to champion the great white men of internet history. Finally, Johnson put forth the most novel of the historiographical theories, introducing the idea that peer-production is behind the internet, or at least the operating systems that run the computers and apps that access the internet.

Little did they know.

Southern Cross Cable 20 percent price cut not nearly enough – Orcon boss | The National Business Review

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“It is always great to see the price of IRU???s (Indefeasible Rights of Use) dropping, as that will filter through to the wholesale market,” he told NBR.

“However this masks the fact that bandwidth costs per user are still actually increasing.”