‘Sticky Beak the kiwi’ song

Now Sticky Beak the kiwi, that bird from way down under
He’s caused a great commotion and it isn’t any wonder
He’s notified old Santa Claus to notify the deer
That he will pull the Christmas sleigh in the southern hemisphere.

Chorus:
Lots of toys for girls and boys load the Christmas sleigh
He will take the starlight trail along the Milky Way.
Hear the laughing children as they shout aloud with glee:
‘Sticky Beak, Sticky Beak, be sure to call on me.’

Now every little kiwi, and every kangaroo, too,
The wallaby, the weka, and the platypus and emu,
Have made themselves a Christmas tree with stars and shining bright,
So Sticky Beak will see the way to guide the sleigh tonight.

Now Sticky Beak the kiwi, that Maori-land dictator,
Will not allow Rudolph’s nose this side of the equator
So when you hear the sleigh bells ring you’ll know that he’s the boss,
And Sticky Beak will pull the sleigh beneath the Southern Cross.

Merry Christmas!

TPP traps – we need to know the costs as well as the gains

In 2005 the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement (AUSFTA) was signed. Some agricultural tariffs were reduced immediately. Sugar wasn’t. Australian beef won’t enjoy duty free access to the US market until 2023.

Australia accepted that trade – US market access in exchange for US copyright demands.

A report from the Australian Productivity Commission – the Government’s independent research and advisory body – indicated that Australia suffered a net loss under AUSFTA as a whole because of accepting the US copyright demands.

So why has our political leadership not talked about the costs of accepting the US copyright demands?

Why wouldn’t you look at the total cost/benefit analysis? Because you want the political benefit at any cost. Just like the Government did with the Hobbit, and may do over the dissatisfaction Chorus has expressed at the Commerce Commission copper/UBA price determinations.

NZ Rejects International Telecommunications Treaty Changes

The ITU has a role in supporting theexpansion of telecommunications infrastructure, andimproving access to this infrastructure for developingcountries. But telecommunications infrastructure and thedata that travels over it are two different matters, and theexisting governance systems work well.

Spoken like a true structural separatist!

Cyber-bullying: education and narrow focus critical

“We understand that physical bullying is far more prevalent than cyber-bullying and that cyber-bullying peaks in Years 9 and 10. It is clear to us that cyber-bullying cannot be addressed without simultaneously addressing bullying as a whole in schools.”

“While generally supportive of the legislative measures proposed by the Communications (New Media) Bill, InternetNZ has put forward 10 recommendations to address the policy issues it raises. In particular, InternetNZ recommends that the Communications Principles should be used for guidance and education only. Further, given a lack of evidence that a Tribunal is really required, those provisions should be removed from any new legislation developed. A review should be held after two years to determine whether a Tribunal is in fact really needed.”

via InternetNZ

NZ to vote against governments taking over internet

Information Technology Minister Amy Adams says New Zealand will try to block an international move by some governments to take over the running of the internet.

Mrs Adams made the announcement at the first regional internet community conference, NetHui South, in Dunedin on Friday.

Mrs Adams says New Zealand will vote againt the move, because the not-for-profit agencies including ICANN, which organise the worldwide web, are doing a good job.She says the current system allows stakeholders from governments, academia, business and the wider internet community to have input and has proven itself flexible enough to cope with rapid changes in technology.

Internet New Zealand chief executive Vikram Kumar applauded the New Zealand Government’s stance, saying it is a huge step forward as government control of the internet would kill its openness and innovation.

Impressive.

Chorus Decorates its Cabinets

New Zealand Infrastructure Incumbent Chorus, while deploying admittedly smaller cabinets has devised a clever way to not only avoid some of these issues with local residents but perhaps draw attention to the deployment of fiber in a positive way by asking well-known artists to decorate the cabinets. Embracing street art as a way to make your infrastructure components blend in is, I think, pretty clever!

I did not know this.

Vodafone-TelstraClear deal cleared

Commerce Commission chairman Dr Mark Berry said in a statement, “In reaching its decision, the Commission considered that the merged entity would continue to face competition from Telecom, as well as Orcon, Slingshot and other smaller businesses in providing fixed line voice and broadband services to residential and small business customers”.

“The Commission did not find any significant business overlap between Vodafone and TelstraClear in the provision of either mobile phone services or fixed line services to large businesses.

The path to approval was cleared by Vodafone not seeking to acquire all of TelstraClear’s spectrum, which falls in the 4G-friendly 1800MHz and 2100MHz bands.

Ah, so not all spectrum obtained in the deal.

MSD’s Leaky Servers

These locked-down kiosks are provided so you could look for jobs online, send off CVs etc. They???ve had some basic features disabled, which supposedly meant that you couldn???t just open up File Manager and poke around the machine. However, by just using the Open File dialogue in Microsoft Office, you could map any unsecured computer on the network, and then open up any accessible file.

This basically means you can grab any file that wasn???t bolted down on the network, while standing in the middle of a WINZ office. And that???s what I did.

Not exactly rocket science.