‘Sticky Beak the kiwi’ song

Now Sticky Beak the kiwi, that bird from way down under
He’s caused a great commotion and it isn’t any wonder
He’s notified old Santa Claus to notify the deer
That he will pull the Christmas sleigh in the southern hemisphere.

Chorus:
Lots of toys for girls and boys load the Christmas sleigh
He will take the starlight trail along the Milky Way.
Hear the laughing children as they shout aloud with glee:
‘Sticky Beak, Sticky Beak, be sure to call on me.’

Now every little kiwi, and every kangaroo, too,
The wallaby, the weka, and the platypus and emu,
Have made themselves a Christmas tree with stars and shining bright,
So Sticky Beak will see the way to guide the sleigh tonight.

Now Sticky Beak the kiwi, that Maori-land dictator,
Will not allow Rudolph’s nose this side of the equator
So when you hear the sleigh bells ring you’ll know that he’s the boss,
And Sticky Beak will pull the sleigh beneath the Southern Cross.

Merry Christmas!

Nancy Baym: "Artist-Audience Relations in the Age of Social Media"

Social media have transformed relationships between those who create artistic work and those who enjoy it. Culture industries such as the music recording business have been left reeling as fans have gained the ability to distribute amongst themselves and artists have gained the ability to bypass traditional gatekeepers such as labels. The dominant rhetoric has been of ‘piracy,’ yet there are other tales to tell. How does direct access to fans change what it means to be an artist? What rewards are there that weren’t before? How are relational lines between fans and friends blurred and with what consequences? What new challenges other than making a living do artists face?

“To suggest that music is free and social is sort of sacrilege”

Music in the Digital Age – Andrew Dubber

About the Book

This book is a work in progress. A living document, of sorts. Start reading now, and it will grow month by month. Just don’t get it wet, and never feed it after midnight.

Music is both culture and commerce. Those two things are inextricably linked. In different periods of history, music culture and music commerce are profoundly different.

In the age of print, the main way in which music was produced, distributed and consumed was on paper. Music was dots on a page. The electric age, with its introduction of recordings and broadcasting, radically transformed the ways in which music made meaning for people, and consequently the ways in which it made money.

And just as the electric age was profoundly disruptive to the musicians, businesses and fans of music when it first came along, so too is the digital age.