What the New York Times Should Have Asked

This is what Apple “invented” the idea of sliding a latch to open something. But because they were doing it on a computer they got to patent it. Probably it cost some effort to work out the code to create the image and so forth – although if it cost them millions their programmers are incompetent – even tens of thousands seems high for that particular coding job. But here is the point: Nobody gets to copy their code with or without patents. The thing they actually paid for is protected.

Chorus Decorates its Cabinets

New Zealand Infrastructure Incumbent Chorus, while deploying admittedly smaller cabinets has devised a clever way to not only avoid some of these issues with local residents but perhaps draw attention to the deployment of fiber in a positive way by asking well-known artists to decorate the cabinets. Embracing street art as a way to make your infrastructure components blend in is, I think, pretty clever!

I did not know this.

Storm Recovery ??? Chattanooga Style versus Sandy and Athena

But the smart grid???s benefits to Chattanooga don???t stop there. It is the first city in America to offer up to a gigabit to every home in the city, beating Google???s more famous Kansas City fiber project by several years. More affordable services are offered at 100 mbit/s and 250 mbit/s. These are symmetrical Internet connections that offer 100 or 250 actual megabits uploads and downloads. In contrast, typical telco and cableco connections offer speeds ???up to??? 4 megabits, 15 megabits, or if you???re really, really lucky to live in the right neighborhood, up to 100 megabits.

The business world has noticed Chattanooga???s reliable power and awesome connectivity. Amazon has opened a new distribution center in Chattanooga with some 1700 new jobs and it is ramping up with hundreds more for the Christmas season (citation).

The restoration and operational savings are impressive, but then so is the broadband availability. Chattanooga.

Dronestagram: The Drone???s-Eye View

The political and practical possibilities of drone strikes are the consequence of invisible, distancing technologies, and a technologically-disengaged media and society. Foreign wars and foreign bodies have always counted for less, but the technology that was supposed to bring us closer together is used to obscure and obfuscate. We use military technologies like GPS and Kinect for work and play; they continue to be used militarily to maim and kill, ever further away and ever less visibly.